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The future of Need for Speed: learning from Criterion and th

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"We could force it down player's throats, if we wanted to," says Ghost producer

By its own admission, EA didn't quite hit the ground running on Xbox 360. As Games label boss Frank Gibeau recalled last year, the publisher was slow to nail down the technology necessary to capitalise on emerging trends like HD and online console multiplayer. Gibeau is adamant, however, that this won't happen again on Xbox One and PS4. EA has spent the past few years converting DICE's Frostbite engine into an all-purpose, cross-gen and multiplatform blockbuster monster, as comfortable rendering a fireball spell in Dragon Age: Inquisition on Xbox One, as recreating a helicopter crash in Battlefield 4 for Xbox 360.... read more

The future of Need for Speed: learning from Criterion and th

Postby SilentDark » 15 Nov 2013, 15:43

You can go off and jump straight in feet first and get involved with whoever, or you can play with your friends alone, or if you're having a hard time with either of those things you can play in the single player environment as well, so you can completely remove the online element and play on your own if that's more your speed. And that's fine. It's this approach of giving players choice, because we want players to say 'this is the experience that I want' and not say 'you have to play it like this'. Because that's not what the game is about.


Choice is good, I approve of choice, which was part of the reason I railed against always online. Glad to see offering players a choice is still considered sound business strategy in some parts.
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Re: The future of Need for Speed: learning from Criterion an

Postby Windowlicker79 » 15 Nov 2013, 19:00

SilentDark wrote:
You can go off and jump straight in feet first and get involved with whoever, or you can play with your friends alone, or if you're having a hard time with either of those things you can play in the single player environment as well, so you can completely remove the online element and play on your own if that's more your speed. And that's fine. It's this approach of giving players choice, because we want players to say 'this is the experience that I want' and not say 'you have to play it like this'. Because that's not what the game is about.


Choice is good, I approve of choice, which was part of the reason I railed against always online. Glad to see offering players a choice is still considered sound business strategy in some parts.

You can offer too much choice though. Cancelling the "always online" features effectively neutered a lot of the technological progression that was being made by the Xbox One, holding back features and advancements just for the sake of a tiny fraction of potential users who don't have access to the internet.
Chances are now that games developers are less likely to take full advantage of the cloud processing features, because its not going to be something they can guarantee every player will have. Its a shame that everyone else is losing out because I few people ranted about their "choice" to use a games system built around an online architecture without actually connecting it to the internet. Online access is part of gaming now. A huge part. I just hope the devs still release "always online" games that are clearly labelled so the rest of us don't have to miss out.
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Re: The future of Need for Speed: learning from Criterion an

Postby SilentDark » 15 Nov 2013, 20:38

Although the first time Xbox One went down due to network problems, you'd cripple every single game using the Cloud. Live going down these days is basically an inconvenience, if always online had been implimented it would turn your £429 console into an overpriced blu ray player whenever Live went down.
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